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lambtime:

Brahea edulis
Guadalupe Palm

• Keywords:  Tree, Palm
• Family: Arecaceae
• Sunset Zones: 12-24 USDA Zones: 10-11
• Full Sun, Little to No Water 
• Grows to a maximum of 30’ tall and 15’ wide
• Commonly available in 5 gal, 15 gal, 24” box, 36” box, up to 15 foot of trunk

Brahea edulis is a palm endemic to Guadalupe Island, Mexico.  The native population is marked as endangered due to changes in its natural environment.  Guadalupe Island suffered from an overpopulation of goats that are known for eating tree saplings, preventing regrowth of the native trees.  The goat population has been reduced from 200,000 to 5,000, allowing for the trees to start making a comeback.  While endangered in the wild, the palm is easily cultivated in California and is gaining popularity for landscape use. 

The Guadalupe Palm is known for its tropical appearance and lush canopy.   The palm grows approximately a foot a year and palm fronds fall off naturally, so tree trimming and trunk cleaning are not required.  The Guadalupe Palm does well in fog, heat and coastal conditions but requires full sun.  It will grow in almost any soil, tolerating drought and neglect, but well-watered specimens will look better.  It is known to grow throughout all of California.  The large seeds of the palm have an edible pulp with a flavor reminiscent of dates.

molieresphotography:

Bosc de Bellver, Mallorca, Spain. Copyrights Val Moliere March 2014

molieresphotography:

Bosc de Bellver, Mallorca, Spain. Copyrights Val Moliere March 2014

chasing-yesterdays:

The Majesty Oak of the Fredville Estate Park in Kent, England, believed to be 500-600 years old.
Source: Champion Trees of Britain and Ireland
More information on ancient trees in the UK.

chasing-yesterdays:

The Majesty Oak of the Fredville Estate Park in Kent, England, believed to be 500-600 years old.

Source: Champion Trees of Britain and Ireland

More information on ancient trees in the UK.

surroundedbybeauty-gardendesign:

Mexican Feather Grass + Artimesia + Russian Sage + Morning Light Grass + Ageratum // Could quite possibly be my most favorite grouping of plantings // This would make a beautiful naturalistic garden on the Outer Banks…. where the edge of your planned garden blends into the natural landscape and surrounding….. 

surroundedbybeauty-gardendesign:

Mexican Feather Grass + Artimesia + Russian Sage + Morning Light Grass + Ageratum // Could quite possibly be my most favorite grouping of plantings // This would make a beautiful naturalistic garden on the Outer Banks…. where the edge of your planned garden blends into the natural landscape and surrounding….. 

brutalgeneration:

P1010259 (by pboehi)

brutalgeneration:

P1010259 (by pboehi)

architizer:

“Our client wanted the approach to the house to be an experience, and it is,” Sang says. Read more.

architizer:

“Our client wanted the approach to the house to be an experience, and it is,” Sang says. Read more.